Corporate Liberalism Goes Unnoticed By Most Americans–Here’s What To Know

According to a recent Harvard/Harris study, the majority of voters had little knowledge of the left-wing investing philosophy known as environmental, social, and governance (ESG).

Only 36% of the 1,845 registered voters who responded to the question on whether they had heard of ESG investment said that they had, while 64% claimed they had not.

ESG investing is a type of leftist advocacy in the financial industry that is used to impact how Wall Street financial companies and businesses, like BlackRock, continue taking political and social roles that have nothing to do with their company’s operations, such as climate change and the inclusion, equity, and diversity goal in mind.

Furthermore, less than half ( 48%) believe that investment management have a “obligation” to consider environment and ESG when investing their hard-earned cash. A majority ( 52%) believe that “investment management have an obligation to put returns before anything else.”

Respondents were also questioned about President Joe Biden’s recent rejection of a measure that would have overturned his Labor Department regulation enabling left-wing ESG policies to be incorporated in retirement investment.

His veto to enable retirement fund directors to integrate ESG was backed by a majority (53 percent). In comparison, 47 percent rejected the veto because pension fund directors shouldn’t be permitted to include ESG into their investment decisions.

BlackRock is the world’s biggest asset management, and it actively promotes ESG investment, which has earned the corporation criticism from Republicans across all levels of government, including state treasurers, the House of Representatives, including presidential candidates.

In fact, a majority (56%) of respondents agreed that states should blacklist financial firms that use ESG investment strategies, despite the fact that state legislation might theoretically require state pensions and other public organizations to sell their holdings in some funds. Only 44% were opposed.

The Harvard/Harris survey was conducted with 1,845 registered voters from April 18 to 19. There was no mention of a margin of error.

Author: Steven Sinclaire

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